Motivations to avoid childbearing among contraceptive users in Honduras: which women are ambivalent?

Janine Barden-Ofallon, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ilene S. Speizer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jessica Levy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Javier Calix, Program for the Development of the Infant and the Mother (PRODIM)
Francisco Rodriguez, Program for the Development of the Infant and the Mother (PRODIM)

This study explores fertility motivation among 745 women using injections and IUDs in Honduras. Women in this sample reporting that it would be “no problem” or a “small problem” if they became pregnant in the next few weeks are considered to have ambivalent fertility desires. Among injection users wanting to delay childbearing 2+ years, 17% report “small problem” and 27% report “no problem.” Comparable percentages are found for the IUD users. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that within the sample, younger users and mothers of higher parity are less likely to be ambivalent and more motivated to avoid a pregnancy; whereas, injection users who perceive that their partner wants a child soon are the most likely to be ambivalent. This study demonstrates that ambivalence is common among injection and IUD users in Honduras. Programs should focus their attentions on the most motivated users and encourage women and men to discuss fertility desires.

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Presented in Poster Session 1

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